Telesure Lane

Auto & General Park

Telesure Lane

Randburg

2055

Gauteng

South Africa

-25.9803685

28.0138512

25 Fountain Rd

Fountain Rd

Sandton

2191

Gauteng

South Africa

-26.00346

28.01755

Premium

plastics - raw materials, powd...

Old Pretoria rd

Corporate Park South, 18 Gazelle Avenue

Old Pretoria rd

Midrand

1685

Gauteng

South Africa

-25.9451873

28.139867500000037

Premium

plastics - raw materials, powd...

306 Kyalami Blvrd

Kyalami Blvrd

Midrand

1685

Gauteng

South Africa

-25.992996

28.067539

12th Rd

12th Rd

Midrand

1686

Gauteng

South Africa

571 11th Rd

MidrandNywerheidspk

11th Rd

Midrand

1682

Gauteng

South Africa

-26.034877

28.150005

16 Stirrup Lne

Stirrup Lne

Sandton

2191

Gauteng

South Africa

-26.04766

28.08787

16 Baker St

Baker St

Sandton

2021

Gauteng

South Africa

-26.05683

28.04212

Richards Dr

Gallagher Corner Shop C8B

Richards Dr

Midrand

1682

Gauteng

South Africa

Resins

Resins are better known as a thick liquid that hardens into an enamel-like finish. Most resins are used for production of items like varnishes and adhesives, including food glazing agents. This hydrocarbon secretion of the coniferous tree has a chemical property that can also be used as a raw material for incense and perfume.
 
The art of harvesting pine resin dates back to Gallo-Roman times. Resin is also sometimes confused with other liquids from plants like sap, latex, or mucilage. Saps in particular, has a nutritive function that is not available in resins. To date, there is no common view by the scientific community as to why plants secrete resins. Some scientists believe that resins are a waste product. However, their protective benefits to certain plants are widely accepted. This liquid is mostly found circulating throughout a coniferous tree in order to seal any damage to the tree.
 
Resin melts when heated and is soluble in alcohol and essential oils, but it is insoluble in water. It burns with a bright smoky flame. Harder resins are mostly used for varnishes and adhesives. This is while gum resins, which contain essential oils, are used more as therapeutic oils.
 
Resin is also used in many other household products like nail polish. It is believed that in the past both boxers and ballet dancers used crushed resin to their shoes to increase grip on slippery surfaces. This product was reportedly once used as a medium for sculpture.
 
For more information about resins, visit the Yellowpages website.

Resins

Resins are better known as a thick liquid that hardens into an enamel-like finish. Most resins are used for production of items like varnishes and adhesives, including food glazing agents. This hydrocarbon secretion of the coniferous tree has a chemical property that can also be used as a raw material for incense and perfume.
 
The art of harvesting pine resin dates back to Gallo-Roman times. Resin is also sometimes confused with other liquids from plants like sap, latex, or mucilage. Saps in particular, has a nutritive function that is not available in resins. To date, there is no common view by the scientific community as to why plants secrete resins. Some scientists believe that resins are a waste product. However, their protective benefits to certain plants are widely accepted. This liquid is mostly found circulating throughout a coniferous tree in order to seal any damage to the tree.
 
Resin melts when heated and is soluble in alcohol and essential oils, but it is insoluble in water. It burns with a bright smoky flame. Harder resins are mostly used for varnishes and adhesives. This is while gum resins, which contain essential oils, are used more as therapeutic oils.
 
Resin is also used in many other household products like nail polish. It is believed that in the past both boxers and ballet dancers used crushed resin to their shoes to increase grip on slippery surfaces. This product was reportedly once used as a medium for sculpture.
 
For more information about resins, visit the Yellowpages website.

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